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    Three Tips To Enjoy Your Life More

    Three tips to enjoy your life more  …

    1: Have a daily ritual around enjoyment:  

    Upon waking, ask yourself, “What do I look forward  

    to most today.”

    At the end of your day, ask yourself, 

    “What was the most enjoyable part of my day and why? 

    2: Whenever you eat try to focus on the

    taste of your  food for just one minute.  

    What does it taste like?

    Try to identify the different 

    sensations.

    Salty? Sweet? Bitter? Sour?   

    If you are eating with someone, comment to them 

    about each observation. 

    This tip comes out of the research which suggests  

    that eating smaller portions of food with more  

    mindfulness can increase your actual enjoyment  

    of what you are eating.  

    3:  Put a reminder in your calendar  

    Decide what is a priority for you each day and then set reminders

    in your calendar, phone, or computer to remind yourself regularly to

    enjoy whatever is most important in your life.

    Take Action: 

    Try these three tips to enjoy your life more.

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop strong

    resilience so they can perform at high levels in all facets of

    their lives. 

     

    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing 

    Jamie +64 21 772 079 

    ‘You have to enjoy life. Always be surrounded by  
    people that you like, people who have a nice  
    conversation. There are so many positive things  
    to think about.’ Sophia Loren 
     

    See Some Green

    Certain colours make us think of certain things.  

    Ever wonder why all sales signs are red, for example?  

    It’s because people react faster and more 
    forcefully when they see the colour.  

    People tend to associate the colour red with a  
    danger cue, and that attracts attention. 

    Guess which colour provides the biggest boost in  
    motivation and energy? 

    The colour green. 

    That’s why we should all ‘see some green’!

    Researchers have found in two studies that  
    surrounding yourself with a bit of green provides  
    a boost in motivation; and also that a glimpse 
    of the colour green sparks creativity. 

    One study asked subjects to perform three cycling  
    exercises while watching a video of a rural cycling course.  

    The videos were randomly selected to have green, grey,  
    or red filters. 

    The green filter made the cyclists happier and less tired.  
     

    Simply seeing lots of green made them more motivated. 

    Take Action: 

    How can you ‘see more green’ in your life? Go outside!  
     
    Take a stroll in a garden, or anywhere with shrubs and  
    greenery. Go out and walk in these places. In addition to  
    seeing more green; you’ll be a lot more motivated after a brief  
    physical exertion and some fresh air. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop strong resilience 
    so they can perform at high levels in all facets of their lives. 

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford 

    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing 

    Jamie +64 21 772 079 

    ‘Green is the prime colour of the world, and that from  
    which its loveliness arises.’ Pedro Calderon de la Barca

    Inspire Yourself With A Positive Story

    One of the fastest ways to make yourself feel more  
    positive is to read an inspirational positive story.   

    Here is a great example about choice: 

    Every day we have two choices 

    Michael is the kind of guy you love to hate. He is  
    always in a good mood, and always has something 
    positive to say.  

    When someone would ask him how he was doing,  
    he would reply, “If I were any better, I would be twins!”  

    He was a natural motivator. If an employee was having  
    a bad day, Michael was there telling the employee how  
    to look on the positive side of the situation. 

    Seeing this style really made me curious, so one day I  
    went up to Michael and asked him, “I don’t get it! You can’t  
    be a positive person all of the time. How do you do it?”  

    Michael replied, “Each morning I wake up and say to  
    myself! You have two choices today. You can choose  
    to be in a good mood or you can choose to be in a bad  
    mood. I choose to be in a good mood.” 

    I reflected on what Michael said. Soon thereafter, I left  
    the Tower Industry to start my own business. We lost  
    touch, but I often thought about him when I made a  
    choice about life instead of reacting to it. 

    Several years later, I heard that Michael was involved 
    in a bad accident, falling some sixty feet from a  
    communications tower.  

    After eighteen hours of surgery and weeks of intensive  
    care, Michael was released from the hospital with rods  
    placed in his back. 

    I saw Michael about six months after the accident.  

    When I asked him how he was, he replied, “If I were  
    any better, I’d be twins. Want to see my scars?”  

    I declined to see his wounds, but I did ask him what 
    had gone through his mind as the accident took place. 

    “The first thing that went through my mind was the  
    well-being of my soon to be born daughter, “Michael  
    replied.  “Then, as I lay on the ground, I remembered  
    that I had two choices: I could choose to live or I could  
    choose to die. I chose to live!” 

    “Weren’t you scared? Did you lose consciousness?” 
    I asked.  

    Michael continued, “… the paramedics were great.  

    They kept telling me I was going to be fine, But when 
    they wheeled me into the ER I saw the expressions on  
    the faces of the doctors and nurses.” I got really scared.  
    In their eyes, I read, “he’s a dead man.”  

    I knew I needed to take action. 

    “What did you do?” I asked.  

    “Well, there was a big burly nurse shouting questions at me.  
    She asked if I was allergic to anything.” 

    “Yes,” I replied. The doctors and nurses stopped working  
    as they waited for my reply.  

    I took a deep breath and yelled, “Gravity!”. 

    Over their laughter, I told them, “I am choosing to live.  
    Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead.” 

    Michael lived, thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also  
    because of his amazing attitude.  

    I learned from him that every day we have the choice to  
    live fully.  Attitude, after all, is everything.  

    What a great positive story to help us think about how we handle life’s challenges and to realise that we have choices every day.

    Action Exercise: 

    Go to your bookshop or library and get a copy of any of  
    the books in the series ‘Chicken Soup for the Soul’.    

    Each book has around 100 true inspirational positive stories.   

    Reading even one of them can make you feel great.   

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience 
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important 
    things in all aspects of their lives. 


    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbein

    The surprising reason we aren’t as resilient as we think – and what Kiwi women can do about it

    Are you Resilient?

    If there was ever a need for resilience, it is the dumpster fire of 2020 – but although we pride ourselves on that good old Kiwi can-do attitude, it seems that New Zealanders – especially women – could use a bit of a top up.

    Interview with Jamie Ford for capsulenz.com

    There have been plenty of studies over the last 20 years has shown that Kiwis aren’t very resilient – that’s really surprising to us! Why do you think that is, and what areas especially are we struggling with?

    This dates back to our ancestors leaving the United Kingdom for a better life here in New Zealand. They wanted to say goodbye to the uncertainty of life at the hands of landowners as well as no hope of ever owning their own plot of land.

    But on arrival, dreams were dashed, hopes evaporated, uncertainty increased, and they had to settle for a hard life.

    This caused negative thinking and has been accidentally passed on from generation to generation. We now find ourselves with a less than resilient mindset that has been normalised – and we do not notice it.

    An examination of the diaries and letters of our forebears, along with the content of today’s social media, might well substantiate this.

    As a nation, we tend to struggle with the accidentally learned habit of thinking that reasons for adversities and setbacks are:

    • Permanent – ‘it will have a long-term downside’
    • Global – ‘it will have a negative impact on many aspects of life’
    • Personal – ‘it’s my fault’

    To help combat this, I’m working with organisations like Southern Cross Health Insurance, to offer their employees science-based resilience development training – something that has never been as important as in this COVID-19 year.

    This kind of support extends well beyond the immediate positive impact on staff and business – the benefits also have a lifelong increase on peoples’ wellbeing and happiness.

    When it comes to Kiwi women, we’ve been disproportionally affected during the pandemic with redundancies – and that’s before dealing with families in lockdown and the stress of making ends meet. What are some of the best tips you can offer for those who are struggling through Covid-19’s consequences?

    It’s important for women to stop personalising the impact and remind themselves that nothing about them is redundant. It’s only the job that was made redundant.

    Start reminding yourself, and keep reminding yourself, that you yourself are not redundant. You still have all the skills and abilities, the capabilities and expertise that made you a valuable employee before the pandemic.

    In your self-talk – your internal dialogue – make sure you remind yourself of all of the external reasons for the pandemic and its impact on your life and the lives of loved ones.

    All of these things are out of your control.

    And lastly make a list of the good things going on in your life to help you focus on the positives despite the struggles many people are finding themselves with.

    Especially with working from home, the blur between home and work has been harder to separate – do you think people have actually worked longer hours than usual thanks to working from home pressures – e.g. making sure bosses know you’re working, no set home time, etc?

    Thanks to the internet, it’s highly likely that many Kiwis are working longer hours than usual. It instils an ‘always on’ culture and an expectation of immediately responding – even outside traditional work hours, and now these lines have become even more blurred as people work from home more.

    Some people are also fearful of losing their jobs, so they work longer hours so as not to be seen as dispensable.

    If possible, set up a separate working space at home – use this space for work only, and ‘close the door’ at the end of your working day.

    A 20-30 minute walk will also do wonders for ‘letting go’ of the working day.

    Another tip that works well is to intensely focus during dedicated work time as there can be a lot of distractions at home. This will help you to deliver work on time and not have to work extra hours.

    What do you think businesses and employers need to be doing better right now to support their workers?

    Demonstrating kindness and empathy is definitely at the top of the list. We have seen how successful this has been in our Prime Minister’s approach.

    It’s important that employers are willing to be flexible and adapt to the needs of employees, both in terms of getting to and from work but also the balancing act of working from home. It’s important to be mindful of the hours they’re working during this time and speak to them about it if need be.

    Finally, changing your mindset is crucial.

    I run resilience workshops with Kiwi organisations around the country like Southern Cross Health Insurance who value workplace wellbeing and supporting their people through personal and professional challenges.

    These seminars help to demonstrate exactly how much of an impact your mindset can have on your mood and your emotions.

    Using science-based concepts, such as a ‘temporary versus permanent’ mindset and not letting others control your emotions, will positively impact the way employees can manage adversities and setbacks.

    Are there any other tools you’d recommend for Kiwis to help them become more resilient in the workplace?

    • Steer clear of the people who have a negative attitude
    • Find the people whose glass is always half full and spend time with them
    • Get out at lunch time and exercise
    • Be proactive in keeping your boss informed while you work from home. This will help to increase trust and enable you to work autonomously
    • Invent ways to make work enjoyable

    Original articles:
    Capsulenz.com

    Stuff.co.nz

    To find out more or to enquire about Resilient Minds workshops, courses, or coaching, email [email protected] or call Jamie on 09 414 2942.

    The 1000 Marbles

    One of the best ways to create more happiness in your 
    life is to get more pleasure and enjoyment out of each day.
    A fun way to do this is to remember the 1000 marbles story.  

    This was written by Jeff Davis many years ago and has  
    now been reprinted thousands of times.  

    Here’s how Jeff Davis’ 1000 Marbles story goes … 

    I turned the dial up into the phone portion of the band  
    on my ham radio in order to listen to a Saturday morning  
    swap net.  

    Along the way, I came across an older sounding chap, 
    with a tremendous signal and a golden voice.  

    He was telling whoever he was talking with something  
    about “a thousand marbles”. 

    I was intrigued and stopped to listen.  

    “Well, Tom, it sure sounds like you’re busy with your job.  
    I’m sure they pay you well but it’s a shame you have to  
    be away from home and your family so much. Hard to  
    believe a young fellow should have to work sixty or  
    seventy hours a week to make ends meet. Too bad  
    you missed your daughter’s dance recital.”  

    He continued, “Let me tell you something that has helped  
    me keep a good perspective on my own priorities.” 

    And that’s when he began to explain his theory of  
    ‘1000 marbles.’ “You see, I sat down one day and  
    did a little arithmetic. The average person lives about  
    seventy-five years. I know, some live more and some  
    live less, but on average, folks live about seventy-five years. 

    Now then, I multiplied 75 times 52 and I came up with 3900  
    which is the number of Saturdays that the average person  
    has in their entire lifetime. It took me until I was fifty-five  
    years old to think about all this in any detail”, he went on,  
    “and by that time I had lived through over twenty-eight  
    hundred Saturdays. I got to thinking that if I lived to be  
    seventy-five, I only had about a thousand of them left  
    to enjoy. 

    So I went to a toy store and bought every single marble  
    they had. I ended up having to visit three toy stores to  
    round-up 1000 marbles. I took them home and put  
    them inside of a large, clear plastic container right  
    here in the shack next to my gear. 

    Every Saturday since then, I have taken one marble  
    out and thrown it away. I found that by watching the  
    marbles diminish, I focused more on the really important  
    things in life. There is nothing like watching your time  
    here on this earth run out to help get your priorities straight. 

    This morning, I took the very last marble out of the container.  
    I figure if I make it until next Saturday then I have been given 
    a little extra time. And the one thing we can all use is a little  
    more time. 

    It was nice to meet you Tom, I hope you spend more time  
    with your family, and I hope to meet you again here on the  
    band. This is K9NZQ, clear and going QRT, good morning!”   

    I had planned to work on the antenna that morning, and then  
    I was going to meet up with a few hams to work on the next  
    club newsletter.  Instead, I went upstairs and woke my wife  
    up with a kiss. “C’mon honey, I’m taking you and the kids  
    to breakfast.”  

    “What brought this on?” she asked with a smile. “Oh,  
    nothing special, it’s just been a long time since we spent  
    a Saturday together with the kids. Hey, can we stop at a  
    toy store while we’re out? I need to buy some marbles.” 

    Action Exercise:  
     
    Work out the number of weekends you potentially have  
    left to enjoy.  When you realise how limited this is, you  
    tend to value each day a lot more.  

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience 
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important 
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Increase your Resilience: 
    Our next open resilience development programme is on at the University of Auckland on November 26th and 27th

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford 
    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing

    How To Make Good Decisions

    Here are two keys to help you regularly make good decisions to improve your life. 

    Key 1:   Value Is In The Eye Of The Beholder 

    How much is a litre of water worth? 

    Well, if you’re reading this, you can probably get a 
    litre of water for a few cents from your kitchen tap.  

    Yet, if you were dying of thirst in a desert, you’d  
    happily pay a hundred bucks for it, right?  

    On the other hand, you’d pay a hundred bucks  
    an hour for a plumber to  avoid the water  being  
    there in the first place (in your flooded basement,  
    that is). 

    Many people believe value is intrinsic to an object.  

    Sure, water is water is water, but its value varies  
    enormously depending on what you need it for. 

    Decision making is a very personal business  
    — it’s about assessing what’s valuable  to you.  

    There’s no  absolute  best job, best car or best life 
    to be lived: value is in the eye of the decision maker

    How to Apply This Insight 

    Always decide on your own. 

    Sure, factor in other people’s opinions, but bear in  
    mind that they may value things (very) differently.  

    Blindly following other people’s advice may  
    lead to disastrous decisions — even if they  
    are based on “sound” advice from people  
    with the best intentions of helping you. 

    Key 2:  Your Decision Outcome Can Be No  
    Better Than Your Best Alternative 

    Many people believe that if they just think  hard and long  
    enough, great outcomes will result from their decisions. 

    The truth is: no matter how much effort you put in,  no  
    decision outcome can be better than the best alternative  
    you considered.  

    And no amount of analysis or systematic thinking will change  
    that. 

    Having a good amount of alternatives to explore and choose  
    from, then, is essential for making great decisions. 

    If you’re having a hard time deciding, it doesn’t mean you’re a  
    poor decision maker: most likely you’re just out of decent  
    alternatives. 

    How to Apply This Insight 

    Generate many alternatives.  Before jumping in and  
    deciding among just two or three options that first  
    come to mind, spend time generating  plenty of  new 
    alternatives.  

    Take Action:  

    The next time you have to make a decision use  
    one or both of these simple keys 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience 
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important 
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Increase Your Resilience: 
    Our next open resilience development programme is on at the University of Auckland on November 26th and 27th

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford 

     ‘A wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man  
    follows the public opinion’ 

    ––Grantland Rice 


    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing

    How To Eliminate Clutter In Your Life

    Is clutter weighing you down at home and the office? 

    Not sure where to start when it comes to clearing things out? 

    Here are 3 ideas to help you eliminate clutter to simplify and  
    streamline your life. 

    1. Tidy up your desk 

    Do you find it difficult to work on your desk or find office  
    supplies when you need them? Remove old sticky notes,  
    out-dated papers and notes, junk mail, magazines, as well  
    as any obvious trash and wrappers from your work space.  
    Put office supplies such as pens, paper clips and pushpins  
    in small decorative containers, or store items in flat storage  
    bins or trays in your desk drawers. Don’t forget to chuck  
    any broken office supplies or dead plants that are on your  
    desk or sitting in your office. 

    2. Clear out your closet 

    Begin by purging any clothes that are obviously stained,  
    damaged, ripped, torn, or no longer fit. Next, remove any  
    clothing and accessories you no longer want or need.  
    Finally, take a good look at items you haven’t worn or  
    used in a year or two as well as items that are out-dated.  
    Will you really use these items soon, say tomorrow or  
    even in a months’ time? It might be time to bite the bullet  
    and say goodbye to these items. 

    3. Give your computer a cleanse 

    Clutter can appear in many different forms on your computer.  
    Consider clearing out files from your desktop screen (file items  
    or delete them), cleaning out or emptying your computer’s trash  
    or recycle bin, defragmenting your drive, or getting rid of  
    applications and programs you no longer use. Finish things  
    off by wiping down your computer’s screen and keyboard with  
    an appropriate computer cleansing solution and cloth to clear  
    off dirt and germs. 

    Take Action 
    Pick one of these tips to handle clutter in your life and use  
    it in the next week. 

    Go forth and eliminate clutter!

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience 
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important 
    things in all aspects of their lives.  

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford 

     “Have nothing in your home that you do not know to  
    be useful and believe to be beautiful.” 

    ––William Morris 


    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing 
     

    3 Easy Tips For Handling Stress

    Most of us admit to feeling stressed at least some of the time, and we know the importance of relaxing and slowing down, but how often do we actually take the time to do it? Here are 3 tips for you to try today to ensure you’re handling stress in your life. 

    1. Breathe Deeply 

    Take a 5-minute break and focus on your breathing.  
    Sit up straight, eyes closed, with a hand on your belly.  
    Slowly inhale through your nose, feeling the breath  
    start in your abdomen and work its way to the top of  
    your head. Reverse the process as you exhale through  
    your mouth. 

    2. Reach Out 

    Your social network is one of your best tools for handling  
    stress. Talk to others — preferably face to face, or at least  
    on the phone. Share what’s going on. You can get a fresh  
    perspective while keeping your connection strong. 

    3. Laugh Out Loud 

    A good belly laugh doesn’t just lighten the load mentally.  
    It lowers cortisol, your body’s stress hormone, and boosts  
    brain chemicals called endorphins, which help your mood.  
    Lighten up by tuning in to your favourite sitcom or video,  
    reading the comics, or chatting with someone who makes  
    you smile. 

    Take Action:  
     
    If you’re not handling stress well, try any of these 3 stress buster tips the next time you find yourself needing to relax more. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience 
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important 
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford

     “The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to  
    choose one thought over another

    ––William James 


    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing 

    5 Things Happy People Do Differently

    If you’re looking to improve your ability to find happiness, then  
    check out these 5 things happy people do differently. 

    1. Happy people find balance in their lives 

    Folks who are happy have this in common: they’re  
    content with what they have, and don’t waste a whole  
    lot of time worrying and stressing over things they don’t.  

    Unhappy people do the opposite: they spend too much  
    time thinking about what they don’t have.  

    Happy people lead balanced lives. This means they  
    make time for all the things that are important to them,  
    whether it’s family, friends, career, health, religion, etc. 

    2. Happy people don’t sweat the small stuff 

    One of the biggest things happy people do differently  
    compared to unhappy people is they let stuff go. 

     Bad things happen to good people sometimes.  

    Happy people realize this, are able to take things  
    in stride, and move on.  

    Unhappy people tend to dwell on minor inconveniences  
    and issues, which can perpetuate feelings of sadness,  
    guilt, resentment, greed, and anger. 

    3. Happy people surround themselves with  
    other happy people 

    One defining characteristic of happy people is they  
    tend to hang out with other happy people.  

    If you’re struggling with a bout of sadness, depression,  
    worry, or anger, spend more time with your happiest  
    friends or family members.  

    Chances are, you’ll find that their positive attitude rubs  
    off on you. 

    4.  Happy people are passionate 

    Another thing happy people have in common is their  
    ability to find their passions in life and pursue those  
    passions to the fullest. Happy people have found  
    what they’re looking for, and they spend their time  
    doing what they love. 

    5. Happy people see challenges as opportunities 

    Folks who are happy accept challenges and use  
    them as opportunities to learn and grow.  

    They turn negatives into positives and make the  
    best out of seemingly bad situations. They don’t  
    dwell on things that are out of their control; rather,  
    they seek solutions and creative ways of overcoming  
    obstacles. 

    Take Action
     
    If you’d like to bring a little more happiness into your  
    life, think about the 5 principles above and how you  
    can use them to make yourself happier. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience 
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important 
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Warm regards, 

    Jamie Ford 

    ‘People don’t notice whether it’s winter or summer  
    when they’re happy.’ 

    Anton Chekhov  

    www.resilientminds.co.nz 
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing 

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    Are You a Potato, Egg, Or Coffee Bean?

    Potato, egg, or coffee bean?

    Once upon a time a daughter complained to her father that her life was miserable and that she didn’t know how she was going to make it.  

    She was tired of fighting and struggling all the time.  

    It seemed just as one problem was solved, another one soon followed. 

    Her father, a chef, took her to the kitchen. 

    He filled three pots with water and placed each on a high fire.  

    Once the three pots began to boil, he placed potatoes in one pot, eggs in the second pot, and ground coffee beans in the third pot. 

    He then let them sit and boil, without saying a word to his daughter.  

    The daughter, moaned and impatiently waited, wondering what he was doing. 

    After twenty minutes he turned off the burners.  

    He took the potatoes out of the pot and placed them in a bowl.  

    He pulled the boiled eggs out and placed them in a bowl. 

    He then ladled the coffee out and placed it in a cup.  

    Turning to her he asked. “Daughter, what do you see?” 

    “Potatoes, eggs, and coffee,” she hastily replied. 

    “Look closer,” he said, “and touch the potatoes.”  

    She did and noted that they were soft.  

    He then asked her to take an egg and break it.  

    After pulling off the shell, she observed the hard-boiled egg.  

    Finally, he asked her to sip the coffee. 

     Its rich aroma brought a smile to her face. 

    “Father, what does this mean?” she asked. 

    He then explained that the potatoes, the eggs and
    coffee beans had each faced the same adversity
    – the boiling water. 

    However, each one reacted differently. 

    The potato went in strong, hard, and unrelenting,
    but in boiling water, it became soft and weak. 

    The egg was fragile, with the thin outer shell protecting
    its liquid interior until it was put in the boiling water.  

    Then the inside of the egg became hard. 

    However, the ground coffee beans were unique.  

    After they were exposed to the boiling water, they
    changed the water and created something new. 

    “Which are you?,” he asked his daughter.

    “When adversity knocks on your door, how do you respond?  

    Are you a potato, egg, or coffee bean?  ‘  

    Moral:  

    In life, things happen around us, things happen to us,
    but the only thing that truly matters is what happens within us.  

    Which one are you?  

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford

     “Whatever you want to do, do it now. There are so many  
    tomorrows.”

    ––Michael Landon  

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    How To Live Well One Day At A Time

    The happiest people and the unhappiest
    people of this world often experience similar things in
    their day: Challenges at the office, traffic filled motorways,
    the seemingly endless stream of negative news and
    constant levels of change. But not all people truly live well.

    What separates the happy from the unhappy is that the
    joyful ones give their mental focus to different things,
    because true harmony is to be found within you, not
    outside of you. 

    Happiness is an inside job. If you base your happiness on
    external objects, the moment one of those objects is taken
    away from you, you lose your happiness. 

    Here are four simple strategies to help you live well one
    day at a time:  

    1. Count Your Blessings

    All too often, in the crush of daily life, we fail to notice all the
    good things in our lives. We focus on the less than ideal job
    or the endless time in traffic or on the mountain of bills. 

    By taking a few minutes out of your busy day to count your
    blessings, you will bring a sense of perspective to your life
    that might be missing. 

    Give silent thanks for the great country you live in, your
    good health and loving family, the fact that you have a roof
    over your head and food on the dinner table.  

    Counting your blessings will remind you of the good in
    your life that most take for granted. 

    2. Make the Time to Think 

    When was the last time you sat down quietly and reflected
    on how you are living your life?  

    Are you spending your hours on activities that are enriching
    the quality of your days or on pursuits that add no value at all?  

    Are you growing as a person and contributing to the
    world around you?  

    Can you recall the last time you thought deeply about
    the meaning of life and the legacy you hope to leave? 

    3. Laugh More

    The average 4 year old laughs 300 times a day while the
    average adult laughs 15 times a day.  

    Make the time to watch a funny movie or share a belly
    laugh with your child.  Laughter relaxes you and ensures
    that you don’t take yourself too seriously.  

    As William James said: “We don’t laugh because we are
    happy. We are happy because we laugh.” 

    4. Live Well in the Moment

    Life is a gift. Yet too many of us spend our lives chasing
    that pot of gold on the horizon rather than enjoying the rose
    garden that lies in our backyards.  

    To jump start your life, begin to savour life’s simpler pleasures.
    Watch the sun rise. Read a great piece of literature or relax to
    a great piece of music.  

    Take Action 

    Write down ten things that make you laugh. Then schedule at
    least one of these things into each day.

    Now is the time to live well.

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford

    “A ship in harbour is safe — but that is not what ships are built for.”  

    ––John A. Shedd. 

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    Think Outside The Box

    Short Inspirational stories are powerful reads; 

    The great thing about them is that they’re so easy to
    digest, and there’s always a moral at the end of the story. 

    Whether they’re true stories or not is another thing, as
    many of them are legends supposedly hundreds of years old. 

    Here is a short  story about thinking creatively (think outside the box): 

    In a small Italian town, hundreds of years ago, a small
    business owner owed a large sum of money to a loan-shark.  

    The loan-shark was a very old, unattractive looking guy
    that just so happened to fancy the business owner’s daughter. 

    He decided to offer the businessman a deal that would
    completely wipe out the debt he owed him.  

    However, the catch was that we would only wipe out the
    debt if he could marry the businessman’s daughter.  

    The loan-shark said that he would place two pebbles
    into a bag, one white and one black. 

    The daughter would then have to reach into the bag
    and pick out a pebble. If it was black, the debt would
    be wiped, but the loan-shark would then marry her.  

    If it was white, the debt would also be wiped, but the
    daughter wouldn’t have to marry the loan-shark. 

    Standing on a pebble-strewn path in the businessman’s
    garden, the loan-shark bent over and picked up two
    pebbles. Whilst he was picking them up, the daughter
    noticed that he’d picked up two black pebbles and placed
    them both into the bag. 

    He then asked the daughter to reach into the bag and
    pick one. 

    The daughter naturally had three choices as to what
    she could have done: 

    Refuse to pick a pebble from the bag. 

    Take both pebbles out of the bag and expose the
    loan-shark for cheating. 

    Pick a pebble from the bag fully well knowing it
    was black and sacrifice herself for her father’s freedom. 

    However the daughter thought creatively and came up
    with a fourth option. 

    She drew out a pebble from the bag, and before
    looking at it ‘accidentally’ dropped it into the midst
    of the other pebbles.  

    She said to the loan-shark; 

    “Oh, how clumsy of me. Never mind, if you look into
    the bag for the one that is left, you will be able to tell
    which pebble I picked.” 

    The pebble left in the bag is obviously black, and
    seeing as the loan-shark didn’t want to be exposed,
    he had to play along as if the pebble the daughter
    dropped was white, and clear her father’s debt. 

    Moral of the story: It’s always possible to overcome
    a tough situation through out-of-the-box thinking, and
    not give in to the only options you think you have. 

    When was the last time you made yourself think outside the box?

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Warm regards. 

    Jamie Ford

     “Think left and think right and think low and think high.  
    Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you try.”

    ––Dr. Seuss 

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    How To Stop Worrying

    According to a study by the University of Surrey in the
    United Kingdom, worrying can have long-term chronic
    health consequences, including cardiovascular disease. 

    So how do you stop worrying?  

    Here are three  actions you can take to take your mind
    off of your troubles: 

    1. Change your bedtime

    Researchers at Binghamton University in New York
    found that people who go to bed very late and sleep
    for short amounts of time are more overwhelmed with
    negative thoughts than those who keep more regular
    sleeping hours.  

    They tend to worry about the future and dwell over past
    events, and they have a higher risk of anxiety, depression,
    post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive
    disorder. 

    “Making sure that sleep is obtained during the right time
    of day may be an inexpensive fix  for individuals who are
    bothered by intrusive thoughts,” said Jacob Nota, one
    of the study’s researchers. 

    2. Smell a grapefruit

    Breathing in certain aromas can help reduce stress and help you stop worrying unnecessarily.  

    In a study at James Cancer Hospital in Columbus, Ohio,
    researchers tested the effect of pleasant-smelling essential
    oils by diffusing them in the central nurses’ station.  

    Oncology nurses, who frequently suffer from work-related
    stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout, reported significant
    improvements in tension, worry, and demands over the
    course of the study. 

    One of the essential oils tested was grapefruit, which is
    refreshing and revitalizing, and helped boost the body’s
    feelings of energy and happiness. 

    3. Eat chocolate

    While sweets can cause you to have a sugar high
    and crash, researchers have found that a little
    chocolate can be beneficial for worriers.  

    According to a study published in the Journal
    of Proteome Research, dark chocolate can
    help calm your nerves.  

    Participants who ate one and a half ounces of
    dark chocolate a day for two weeks had reduced
    levels of stress hormones. 

    Take Action

    Try one or more of these three strategies when you
    next find yourself worrying over things, especially those out of your control. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Warm regards 

    Jamie Ford

     “Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties  
    today of its strength.”

    ––Corrie ten Boom 

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    5 Ways To Have More Fun In Your Life

    Here are five easy ways to enjoy more fun in your life 

    1: Laugh to Your Heart’s Content 

    If we wake up in a funk, it’s easy to find ourselves in
    a bummer of a mood that is hard to shake off. Start
    your day by reading funny comics in your newspaper
    or watching a quick video on YouTube that puts a
    smile on your face.  

    2: Dance Like No One’s Watching 

    Movement is a wonderful activity that you can enjoy
    any time for $0.  

    Crank up your favorite 80’s jam and dance in your
    living room. You might feel silly, but I dare you to
    try this and say it wasn’t fun. 

    3: Sing in the Shower

    Belt out a song from your favorite Broadway
    musical during your morning shower if you
    want to instantly feel better. 

    4: Listen to Nature Sounds 

    Go outside and listen to the crickets chirping,
    birds singing and wind blowing. Focus really
    hard and be amazed by the beautiful nature
    sounds that you’ve been too busy to notice. 

    5: Reconnect with an Old Friend 

    When life gets busy, it’s easy to lose touch with
    even the best of friends.  

    Scan through your contacts until you see a name
    that makes you think, “I wonder what happened to
    them?” Call them to re-connect, and if they are
    local, make plans for next weekend. 

    Take Action 

    Try any of these five strategies to add more fun to your life.  

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives. 

    Warm regards. 

    Jamie Ford

    Winning is only half of it. Having fun is the other half.  
    ––Bum Phillips

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    Take A Video Inspiration Break

    One of the easiest ways to feel more positive  
    and uplifted is to watch an inspiring video. So take 5 minutes for an inspiration break and watch this uplifting video: 

    It is an audition on “America’s Got Talent” by a  
    young singer pianist called Kodi Lee who is  
    blind and autistic.  
     
    His amazing performance shocked the audience 
    and left many in tears.   
     
    You can watch the video of Kodi’s audition here: 
     
     
     
    The video makes you feel good watching it. 

    And is a great reminder that the limitations we have  
    don’t have to stop us from achieving results that are  
    extraordinary. 

    Any time you want to feel positive and uplifted in a 
    few minutes just watch a positive inspirational video. 
     
    Take Action: 

    Take an inspiration break and watch Cody’s uplifting video. It’s only 
    8 minutes long  and is guaranteed to make you feel 
    good. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of  
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the  
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Warm regards.

    Jamie Ford

     “The question isn’t who is going to let me;

    it’s who is going to stop me.”  
    ––Ayn Rand

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
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    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    3 Ways To Love Your Job More

    If you don’t enjoy going into your office each day, but want to stay in the same job, try these 3 quick fixes to love your job more.

    1. Declutter your office

    When people feel low on energy, often it’s because
    they’re not clearing out as they go. Their inbox is
    overflowing. Their desk is a disaster. Their file drawers
    are jammed. Decluttering is liberating and empowering and will help you love your job more!

    2. Find a positive image to inspire you and help you cope with a job

    Tape a picture of a special image on your office wall,
    away from your computer and phone. That way, you’ll
    have to turn to look directly at it, which can be transporting.
    The very action of directing your attention away from your
    work opens up the door in your day for a respite, a restart,
    and a new view.  

    3. Laugh more 

    A recent Gallup poll found that people who smile and
    laugh at work are more engaged in their jobs.  

    And the more engaged you are, the happier and more
    enthusiastic you’ll be. This won’t just trickle down to
    the quality of your work; people will want to have you
    on their team. Plus: couldn’t we all use a laugh? 

    Take Action: 

    What will you do this week to love your job more? 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “Happiness, not in another place but this place… 
    not for another hour, but this hour.”

    ––Walt Whitman 

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    Happiness Is An Inside Job

    Happiness is an inside job. So here are two simple strategies to create more
    happiness in your life each day. 

    1: Count Your Blessings 

    All too often, in the crush of daily life, we fail to notice
    all the good things in our lives.  

    We focus on the less than ideal job or the endless time
    in traffic or on the mountain of bills.  

    By taking a few minutes out of your busy day to count
    your blessings, you will bring a sense of perspective to
    your life that might be missing.  

    Give silent thanks for the great country you live in,
    your good health and loving family, the fact that you
    have a roof over your head and food on the dinner table.  

    Counting your blessings will remind you of the good
    in your life that most take for granted. 

    2: Laugh More 

    The average 4 year old laughs 300 times a day while
    the average adult laughs 15 times a day.  

    Make the time to watch a funny movie or share a belly
    laugh with your child.  

    Laughter relaxes you and ensures that you don’t take
    yourself too seriously. 

    As William James said: “We don’t laugh because we
    are happy. We are happy because we laugh.” 

    Action Exercise: 

    Write down ten things that make you happy.  

    Then schedule at least one of these things into each day. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    Slow down and enjoy life. It’s not only the scenery  
    you miss by going too fast – you also miss the sense  
    of where you are going and why.”

    ––Eddie Cantor 

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    How Full Is Your Bucket?

    There’s a wonderful little book on happiness
    called “How full is your bucket?” 

    Here’s what the book has to say: 

    Each of us has an invisible bucket. It is constantly
    emptied or filled, depending on what others say or
    do to us. 

    When our bucket is full, we feel great. 

    When it’s empty, we feel awful. 

    Each of us also has an invisible dipper. 

    When we use that dipper to fill other people’s buckets
    by saying or doing things to increase their positive
    emotions – we also fill our own bucket. 

    But when we use that dipper to dip from others’ buckets
    by saying or doing things that decrease their positive
    emotions – we diminish ourselves. 

    Like the cup that runneth over, a full bucket gives us a
    positive outlook and renewed energy.  

    Every drop in that bucket makes us stronger and more
    optimistic. 

    But an empty bucket poisons our outlook, saps our
    energy, and undermines our will.  

    That’s why every time someone dips from our bucket,
    it hurts us. 

    So we face a choice every moment of every day: We can
    fill one another’s buckets, or we can dip from them.  

    It’s an important choice — one that profoundly influences
    our relationships, productivity, health, and happiness. 

    TAKE ACTION 

    Get a copy of this book“How full is your bucket?” 

    and read what it has to say. It is very good! 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “When one door of happiness closes, another opens,  
    but often we look so long at the closed door that we  
    do not see the one that has been opened for us.”  
    ––Helen Keller 

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    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    How To Have A Good Day Every Day

    As you stumble out of bed and into the shower a new
    day begins. So how can you make it more likely that it
    will be a good or even great day? 

    Here are two tips that should help. 

    1.  Get some positive information into your mind over breakfast

    Start your day with something that does not get you down
    or makes you feel powerless to change your life
    or the world in some small or bigger way e.g.
    Reading a few new posts from positive, funny or
    uplifting blogs or websites.
    Listening to a podcast that boosts your motivation.
    Reading a chapter from a book that inspires you. 

    2. Build a right thing string

    Doing what you deep down think is the right thing will
    make you feel good. It will boost your self-esteem and
    put a spring in your step for an hour or more.  

    Start by doing something that you deep down think is the right thing.  

    Do it right now. 

    Give a genuine compliment to someone at work or in
    your life. Help someone who seems lost with directions.
    Unclutter your work space for 2 minutes. Go and work out.  

    Then add another thing that you think is the right thing to do.  

    Eat an apple instead of an unhealthy snack.  

    When you feel like judging someone in your life or on TV
    or in the newspaper try to find a kinder and more
    understanding perspective. Be generous and compassionate.
    A lot of things we easily take offence or umbrage from are not
    deliberate on the part of other people. Most often they are just
    a simple mistake with no harm intended. 

    Smile and ask how someone’s day is going (and really
    listen to the reply).  

    Then add another thing. And another.  

    Build a small string of doing the right things during
    for example 10-30 minutes to boost your energy
    and the positive feelings you have about yourself
    and your life. 

    Continue the string during your day as best you can. 

    After you have added a right thing to your string –
    no matter how small it is – make sure to take a
    few seconds to pause and to appreciate the good
    thing you did. 

    Action Exercise:

    Try one of these tips to have a great day. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “Every morning we are born again. What we do today  
    is what matters most.”

    Buddha   

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    3 Lessons From Your Dog About What’s Really Important In Life

    Here are three things dogs can teach us about
    what matters most in life: 

    1. Live in the moment

    Although dogs remember things like where the
    treats are kept, what street takes them home and
    who they’ve met before, they only access that
    information when they need it — in the moment.
    Whether they’re eating a bowl of kibble or chasing
    a ball, dogs live for the present moment. The past is
    gone; you can’t do anything about it. The future is
    unknown. The only thing you can really enjoy and
    affect is the present moment. 

    1. Play every day

    Dogs love to play, which usually involves lots of
    movement, whether it’s running, chasing or jumping.  

    This is a good reminder for us to play and move our
    bodies every day as well.  

    Playing opens up your mind and spirit to all kinds
    of new ideas and creativity It’s a needed break
    from the constant 24/7 work environment.  

    And if you can exercise while you play, even better.  

    Dogs actually give you a reason to get out and go walking,
    hiking, or running. 

    1. Enjoy the journey

    When dogs go for a car ride, they stick their head
    out the window, smell the air and feel the wind
    against their fur. They don’t care where they’re
    going. They’re just enjoying the journey.  

    Although goals are great to set, we often forget
    that it’s the journey that matters most. When we
    get too attached to the outcome, we set ourselves
    up for frustration, depression or even anger if
    our exact expectations are not met. Next time
    you set a goal, be open to other possibilities,
    and enjoy every moment of excitement, creativity,
    fun, and lessons on the journey. 

    Action Exercise:

    What life lessons have you learned from dogs? 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “There is no psychiatrist in the world like a  
    puppy licking your face.”

    ––Ben Williams   

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    7 Ways To Feel Happier In The Next 15 Minutes

    1: Crank the tunes. Try NOT smiling while blasting
    your fave feel good song (or 5). 

    2: Write it down. Did you know that taking the time
    to write down 3 positive things each day will make
    you more optimistic and less stressed?  

    3: Get outside. Just a few minutes of fresh air can
    give you a fresh perspective.  

    4: Walk it out. A 15-minute brisk walk gets the heart
    pumping and will decrease stress. For the three 5 minute
    segments give your attention to:
    a) what you can see
    b) what you can hear
    c) what you can feel 

    5: Do something. Whether it’s sending an email or
    clearing the clutter off your dining room table, just
    getting one tiny little thing off your to-do list and onto
    the ‘it’s done’ list will give you a huge mental sigh of
    relief. 

    6: Text a friend. Reaching out to a pal and letting them
    know how awesome they are will make you feel awesome,
    too.  

    7: Smile. In one research study subjects who smiled after
    a stressful activity decreased their heart rate more quickly
    than those who didn’t. It even works if you fake smile! 

    Take Action: 

    Try any of these simple tips to feel happier in the next 15
    minutes. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives.  

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “Reflect upon your present blessings, of which 
    every man has many–not on your past misfortunes,  
    of which all men have some.”

    –– Charles Dickens   

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    3 Life Lessons From Your Cat

    We humans are always looking for guidance for
    how to be better, more efficient, more effective,
    happier and more lovable.  

    Have you ever noticed that cats don’t really seem to care what you think of them?  

    They have a certain confidence that their life has
    meaning and purpose and everything they do is
    important and relevant.  

    It’s time for us bipeds to learn a little something
    from our feline friends. 

    1. Go for the Chicken 

    When a cat wants something, there is no changing
    his mind.

    Whether he’s stalking a spider across the room or
    eyeballing your plate of chicken breasts, it’s tough
    to dissuade a cat from something he wants.  

    Goals are important, and in our disjointed human
    world, a feline-like focus may be just what we need
    to make progress in our personal and professional
    lives.  Incredible things happen when we put our
    energy into a single purpose. 

    2. Aim High 

    Cats have an uncanny ability to jump to places that
    look impossible to reach.  First, they take a good long
    look at where they want to be.  Next, they survey the
    distance and landing area.  Third, they focus and finally,
    they jump.  

    Usually it looks so effortless that you might wonder if
    they could have gone higher.  Take a lesson from the
    kitties and aim high. You’ll likely get further than you
    think. And, if you happen to miss, chances are you’ll
    land on your feet.  

    3. Know and Love Who Feeds You 

    Make no mistake: cats know who feeds them.  

    These people are often held in higher regard
    than others in the household and receive certain
    perks like snuggles, head butts or just regular
    quiet companionship.  

    We humans often take the ones who care for us
    most for granted. Appreciate people in your life
    who love you, care for you, nurture you and, yes,
    feed you.  

    Action Exercise:  

    There are so many things we can learn from cats
    if we take some time to study and emulate their
    behaviour.  

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “A cat has absolute emotional honesty: human beings,  
    for one reason or another, may hide their feelings,  
    but a cat does not.”

    ––Ernest Hemingway   

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    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    A Quick Way To Eliminate Procrastination

    It’s a fact that everyone procrastinates.  

    Everyone has too much to do and too little time. 

     What can you do to stop procrastinating? 

    A quick way to stop procrastinating is by programming
    your subconscious mind. 

    Perhaps the most powerful words you can use to increase
    your productivity are the words;  

    “Do it now! Do it now! Do it now!” 

    Whenever you find yourself procrastinating on an
    important task, repeat to yourself, with energy and
    enthusiasm, the words, “Do it now! Do it now! Do it now!” 

    The amazing discovery is that after you have repeated
    these words 10, 20, or even 100 times, you will find
    yourself programming your  subconscious mind  into
    starting on your most important task and completing
    that job before you do anything else. 

    Throughout the day, when you are distracted by people,
    emails, telephone calls and other factors, and you find
    yourself drifting away from your most important tasks,
    take control of yourself by repeating the words, “Back to
    work! Back to work! Back to work!” 

    Take Action 

    We all procrastinate a little from time-to-time, but when you program
    your subconscious mind to stop procrastinating you will be
    able to get much more done during your day. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford.

    “Procrastination is one of the most common  
    and deadliest of diseases and its toll on success  
    and happiness is heavy.”

    ––Wayne Gretzky   

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    One Year To Live …

    Anthony Burgess was 40 when he learned he
    had only one year of life left to live.  

    He had a brain tumour that would kill him within a year.  

    He knew he had a battle on his hands.  

    He was completely broke at the time and had no assets
    to leave behind for his wife Lynne – soon to be a widow. 

    Burgess had never been a professional novelist in the
    past, but he always knew the potential was inside him
    to be a writer.  

    So, for the sole purpose of leaving royalties behind for
    his wife, he put a piece of paper into a typewriter and
    began typing. 

    He had no certainty that anything he wrote would ever be
    published, but he couldn’t think of anything else to do. 

    “It was January of 1960,” he said, “and according to
    the prognosis, I had a winter and spring and summer
    to live through, and would die with the fall of the first autumn leaf.” 

    Over that period of time – 3 seasons – Burgess wrote energetically,
    finishing five and a half novels before the year was through
    (very nearly the entire lifetime output of E.M. Forster,
    and almost twice that of J. D. Salinger.)  

    But Burgess did not die.  

    His cancer had gone into remission and then disappeared
    altogether. In his long and full life as a novelist (he is best
    known for A Clockwork Orange); he wrote more than 70 books.
    But without the death sentence from cancer, he may
    not have written even one. 

    Many of us are like Anthony Burgess, hiding greatness
    inside, waiting for some external emergency to bring it out.  

    Take Action 

    Ask yourself what you’d do if you had Anthony
    Burgess’s original predicament. “If I had just a year
    to live, how would I live differently? What exactly
    would I do?”  

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford.

    “It is not how much we have, but how much we enjoy,  
    that makes happiness.”

    ––Charles Spurgeon  

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    Make Every Meal A Pleasure

    We all eat every day. And by paying a little attention to our
    normal meals we can make them a delightful experience. 

    Here are some simple ideas you may find useful. 

    1. Pay a little extra for the principal element. For breakfast,
      buy great, freshly roasted coffee — and grind it yourself. For
      lunch, pay a little more for salmon salad rather than tuna.
      For dinner, buy free-range poultry or beef. 
    2. Use your best service. Get out and use the China and silverware
      you really like and enjoy. Stop saving it for rare special occasions.
      Make every occasion special by treating it so. 
    3. Listen to good music. Music is as much a part of a meal as
      water is a part of swimming. The only time you can justify
      not having beautiful music playing softly in the background
      while you’re eating is when you are in the mountains or on
      the beach. 
    4. Don’t read. There is a time for reading, but it is never while
      you are eating.
    5. At some point during the meal, take a moment to think
      about how lucky you are to be eating so well.
    6. Eat slowly. Make each bite a pleasure, each meal memorable.

    Take Action: 

    Use some of these ideas with your next meal and make it a
    delightful pleasure. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop a mindset of
    long-lasting resilience so they can perform at high levels on the
    really important things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford.

    “Eating is not merely a material pleasure. Eating well gives a 
    spectacular joy to life and contributes immensely to goodwill 
    and happy companionship.”

    ––Elsa Schiaparelli  

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    3 Gifts That Create Happiness When Shared

    Did you know that there are gifts that will multiply your
    happiness when you share them with other people? 

    Best of all, they are simple and easy to do every day. 

    1. Share appreciation

    Tell someone how much you appreciate the faith they’ve
    shown in you. Thank them sincerely for being part of your
    life. Tell them how much they are needed.

    Feeling appreciated is one of the most important needs
    that people have. When you share with someone your
    appreciation and gratitude, they will not forget you. 

    Appreciation will return to you many times. 

    2. Share kindness 

    Make a spontaneous gesture of kindness to someone: a smile, a
    compliment, or a favour just for fun. These will multiply and
    spread very rapidly. 

    3. Share enthusiasm 

    If you are excited about a new success, tell someone. 

    If you’re ecstatic about a new project, show your glow. Your
    enthusiasm will inspire others to move forward with actions
    that bring rewarding achievements. 

    Enthusiasm keeps us looking forward to the future. That
    kind of glowing excitement for life is impossible to hide. It is
    contagious and will quickly spread to others. 

    Take Action: 

    Which of these three gifts could you share with other
    people this week? 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives.

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “People don’t notice whether it’s winter or summer when  
    they’re happy.”

    ––Anton Chekhov 

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    How to Get a Great Night’s Sleep

    We spend up to a third of our life sleeping. 

    And a good night’s sleep is a proven way to eliminate stress,
    improve your energy and make you feel positive. 

    Here are four proven tips to sleeping well… 

    1. Keep a regular sleep timetable

    Keeping a regular sleep timetable by going to bed and waking
    up at the same time every day will ultimately help you feel
    energized and refreshed. 

    So set yourself a fixed rest and wake up time that you follow
    every day, even on weekends. 

    1. Avoid late night television

    Many of us will watch television as a way to wind down at night
    or fall asleep. 

    But what many people don’t realise is that television actually
    stimulates the mind, rather than relaxing it. 

    Late night television usually consists of content that either shows
    disturbing material or requires us to think and use our brains. 

    The light from the television can also confuse our body clock,
    making it harder to fall asleep 

    1. Exercise at the right time

    While regular exercise positively impacts sleep quality, it is best
    done in the earlier part of the day. 

    Exercise stimulates the body by raising its temperature, so if you
    exercise later in the evenings you may experience trouble getting
    to sleep as the body requires a cooler temperature in order to
    wind down and promote rest. 

    1. Adopt a pre-bed ritual

    Doing activities that help relax the body will make it easier for you
    to drift off. Things like taking a warm bath, stretching, reading a
    light book or listening to gentle music will help you wind down
    after a long day and ultimately send cues to your body that it is
    almost time to sleep. A calm pre-bed routine will help your body
    prepare for sleep, allowing you to get to sleep more easily. 

    Take Action: 

    So if you are having difficulties sleeping try adopting some of
    these tips to improve your sleep quality 

    And get a great night’s sleep at the same time! 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    “A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor’s book.”

    Irish Proverb

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives.

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    Put It Into Practice

    We can all talk better than we do, so it’s always inspiring to hear from one of our recipients who is putting it into practice.

    Recently, we wrote about “Gratitude and Being Thankful”. And Neville Hill emailed us this in his own words:

    I guess a single thanks is only one word but that one word can mean a lot if you are used to not getting it said at all …not that I am suggesting that either you or I are not . One little habit I have got into is to make, “THANKS”, the very 1st word that I say when I wake from sleep in the morning.

    The reason I started doing this is that I noticed that when I woke I would say something like ‘oh crap’ or ‘oh s*&%’, (or worse), as my body dragged itself out of sleep to the sound of the alarm clock. It simply occurred to me one day that to awake every day with a swear word or a negative phrase escaping my lips had to be the worst possible way to start each day… I won’t bang on but it is part of a new approach to life that both my wife have adopted towards living our lives, and that is to be grateful every day.’

    Thanks for sharing your insights and new habit with us Neville.

    Words of Wisdom for all of us.

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients grow their resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in all aspects of their lives.

    Have a great week.

    Jamie.

    “You have power over your mind -not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.”

    ––Marcus Aurelius

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

    How to have more fun in your life

    Here are 6 ways to have more fun in your life… 

    1. Laugh to Your Heart’s Content 

    If we wake up in a funk, it’s easy to find ourselves in a 
    bummer of a mood that is hard to shake off. Start your 
    day by reading funny comics in your newspaper or watching 
    a quick video on YouTube that puts a smile on your face.  

    1. Change Your Morning Routine

    Add a nice splash of variety to your life by switching up 
    your morning routine. Do you usually eat breakfast at the 
    table? Take your breakfast out to the porch and listen to 
    the birds sing. Do you typically start your day by working 
    out at the gym? Take your training outdoors by running 
    sprints on a nature trail or track. 

    1. Sing in the Shower

    Belt out a song from your favorite Broadway musical during 
    your morning shower if you want to instantly feel better. 

    1. Listen to Nature Sounds

    Go outside and listen to the crickets chirping, birds singing 
    and wind blowing. Focus really hard and be amazed by the 
    beautiful nature sounds that you’ve been too busy to notice. 

    1. Join a Club

    Are you a new mom, a pet-lover, a gaming enthusiast, 
    or an artist?  

    If so, there is a club of people just like you  who would be 
    so happy to have you in their life . 

    1. Reconnect with an Old Friend

    When life gets busy, it’s easy to lose touch with even the 
    best of friends.  

    Scan through your contacts until you see a name that 
    makes you think, “I wonder what happened to them?” 
    Call them to re-connect, and if they are local, make 
    plans for next weekend. 

    Take Action:  

    Try any of these 6 strategies to add more fun to your life.  

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford.

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    Be grateful

    Nothing is more important than your health. 

    If, before you were born, you were given the following choice, 
    which would you choose? 

    To be born a millionaire but crippled 

    To be healthy but penniless 

    Would you trade in your consciousness for half a million dollars? 

    Your ability to move for $250,000? 

    Would you give up your sight for $350,000? 

    Your sense of smell for $100,000? 

    Of the important things in life, wealth is probably not in the 
    top three. 

    So today, just for the record, let’s remind ourselves that… 

    Health is more important than wealth. Loving relationships are 
    more important than wealth. And so is the sense that you are 
    spending your time wisely. 

    If you don’t have health, you cannot enjoy or sometimes even 
    experience the other gifts life gives us. If you have wealth but 
    have no friends to share it with — you have nothing. 

    And even if you have health and wealth and friendship but 
    lack purpose, you are going to spend the rest of your life 
    feeling the lack of it. 

    Here’s a simple way to appreciate your health and all the other 
    blessings that you have: 

    Write down a gratitude list. In other words; all the things in 
    your life that you are grateful for. This might include your 
    good health, your comfortable home, your interesting job, 
    your great friends and anything else you can think of. 

    Then take a few minutes and add a few items to your 
    gratitude list every day. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford

    www.resilientminds.co.nz
    Thought Leaders in Resilience, Productivity, and Wellbeing
    Jamie +64 21 772 079

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    The 90-10 happiness rule

    The 90/10 rule for happiness says that we have no 
    control over about 10% of what happens to us each day. 

    We cannot stop the computer from breaking down. A driver 
    may cut us off in traffic. Someone may be rude to us. 

    We have no control over many things like these each day. 

    The other 90% is different. 

    We determine the other 90%! 

    How? By our reaction to what happens. 

    Imagine that are having breakfast with your family. As you walk 
    to the table you trip over your dog and spill coffee all over your 
    work clothes. You snap at your dog and tell it off for getting in 
    your way. You get angry and upset because you will now be 
    late for work. 

    So you rush around and change your clothes. Breakfast is now 
    very uncomfortable for the rest of your family because of your 
    temper. You drive to work still angry, and have a generally 
    miserable day where nothing seems to go well. 

    Let’s rewind the clock and look at this experience again 
    using the 90/10 rule. 

    Here is what you might have done: 

    Coffee splashes over you. You are about to get angry. Instead 
    you say “Oops, I better watch where I walk and be more 
    careful next time”. Grabbing a towel you rush upstairs. After 
    grabbing a new shirt and your briefcase, you come back down 
    to finish your breakfast. 

    You make a quick phone call to work and let them know you 
    will be a few minutes late today. You laugh and joke with your 
    family at breakfast and leave for work. You arrive at work about 
    ten minutes late and cheerfully greet your workmates. Your day 
    seems to go well. 

    Notice the difference. Both days started the same, but ended 
    differently.  

    Why?  

    Because of how you reacted. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Remember the 90/10 rule. Keep in mind, that the 
    one thing you and I do have control over is how we react 
    to anything that happens to us. 

    Choose how you will react today when things happen that are 
    outside your control. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    The success list

    A success list is a simple way to create more fun,
    pleasure and enjoyment in your life.  

    First get a small pocket notebook. Then get into the 
    habit of writing down in this notebook five or more 
    successes that you have each day. A success is 
    anything that makes you feel good about yourself 
    when it happens. These successes can be things 
    you do or things that happen to you. The key is that
    you felt good about yourself when each success 
    happened. 

    Examples: 

    A success could be something as simple as getting 
    to work on time despite the traffic. It could be someone 
    smiling at you. A success might be getting positive 
    feedback on something you’ve done. A success could 
    be doing a task you’ve been putting off. A success could 
    be meeting with an interesting person who inspires you. 
    A success might be taking one small action step toward 
    an important goal. 

    A success does not have to be earth shattering; however 
    it does have to be something that makes you feel good 
    about yourself when it happened. 

    When you’ve used a success list for three weeks or more; 
    you will have written down over one hundred successes
    you’ve had in this time. 

    Imagine how good you would feel reading a list like this. 

    Think of a success list as being a bit like a photograph 
    album filled with photos of some of the happiest moments 
    in your life. Every time you look at the photos, those happy 
    moments and feelings come back. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Get yourself a pocket notebook today. Start writing at least 
    five successes you have each day in this notebook. 

    Notice how you feel after doing this for a week or two 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    Live fully each day

    The happiest people of this world and the unhappiest 
    people of this world often experience similar things in
    their day:   

    Challenges at the office, traffic filled motorways, the 
    seemingly endless stream of negative news and 
    constant levels of change.  

    What separates the happy from the unhappy is that the
    joyful ones give their mental focus to different things, because
    true harmony is to be found within you, not outside of you.  

    Here are two simple strategies to help you live fully each day: 

    1: Count Your Blessings 

    All too often, in the crush of daily life, we fail to notice all the 
    good things in our lives. We focus on the less than ideal job 
    or the endless time in traffic or on the mountain of bills. By 
    taking a few minutes out of your busy day to count your 
    blessings, you will bring a sense of perspective to your life 
    that might be missing. Give silent thanks for the great 
    country you live in, your good health and loving family, 
    the fact that you have a roof over your head and food 
    on the dinner table. Counting your blessings will remind 
    you of the good in your life that most take for granted. 

    2: Laugh More 

    The average 4 year old laughs 300 times a day while the 
    average adult laughs 15 times a day. Make the time to 
    watch a funny movie or share a belly laugh with your child. 
    Laughter relaxes you and ensures that you don’t take yourself 
    too seriously. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Write down ten things that make you laugh. Then schedule at 
    least one of these things into each day 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    Why taking action makes you feel good

    On any day you take positive action toward your most 
    important goals you will feel great. 

    You will have a feeling of success, achievement and 
    accomplishment. 

    The four keys to achieving goals: 

    Grab a piece of paper and a pen. Or turn on your 
    computer and open a new document. 

    1: Take a few minutes and make a list of at least 10 things 
    you would like to do, have or be over the next 12 months. 

    These could be goals to do with health, job, career, money, 
    travel, relationships and many others.  

    Examples: 

    I’d like to increase my income by 25%. 

    I’d like to take a two week luxury vacation in Italy. 

    I’d like to run a half marathon in under two hours. 

    2: Next, look over your list and select one goal you would 
    like to get started on.  

    You might pick your trip to Italy. 

    3: Now, write down 10 action steps you could take to 
    get closer to achieving this goal. 

    So you could write down things like ‘Read a travel guide 
    on holidaying in Italy, get brochures from five travel agents 
    on luxury holidays in Italy, speak with a friend or colleague 
    who took a trip to Italy’ and so on. 

    4: Now do one of these action steps today. So today you 
    could go the local book shop and buy a travel guide on Italy. 

    Now repeat steps 2, 3 and 4 on a regular basis and soon 
    you will have achieved many of the goals on your list.  

    And as you take action each day toward these goals you 
    will feel wonderful at the same time. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Today, take one or more positive action steps that will 
    get you closer to a goal that is important to you. 
    (Notice how you feel when you take this action.) 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    Experience more ‘adventures’ in your life

    There is an interesting happiness concept that says 
    “The person who experiences the most; wins”. 

    In other words; make sure you have numerous experiences 
    that add to the colour, richness, depth and wisdom of your life.  

    There are dozens of adventures (big and small) waiting 
    for all of us to try; if we just open our eyes and look for them. 

    By engaging in “micro-adventures”- little adventures that 
    you inject into your day – you can often restore the passion 
    from childhood that you may have lost. 

    For Instance: 

    Taking an hour to go to your favourite bookstore and  

    browse through your favourite section, might be a 
    micro-adventure you can engage in today. 

    Or trying Vietnamese food (if you have never tasted it before) 
    could be another micro-adventure you try tonight.  

    Or picking up the phone and having a conversation with
    someone you admire could be another micro-adventure 
    that you schedule into your day. 

    So today, commit yourself from your heart, to experiencing 
    more adventures in your life. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Write down at least 5-10 micro-adventures that you could 
    experience. Plan to do at least one of them this week 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    “The big question is whether you are going to be able to 
    say a hearty yes to your adventure.” Joseph Campbell 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    Eliminate the mosquitoes in your life

    In his Book “High Energy Habits” author Bill Ford talks 
    about “Getting rid of the little things that annoy you”. 

    We can think of the little things that annoy you as being 
    like mosquitoes. They are pesky, irritating and drain you of 
    energy you could use far more productively on other things. 

    Often these ‘mosquitoes’ are some minor annoyance or 
    irritant that that you are tolerating, but are not happy about. 

    Usually you know what to do to fix it, but you have just not 
    yet got around to doing it. 

    We are so busy that these little things do not seem to justify a 
    high priority. 

    But it takes energy to ignore the mosquitoes and it also reduces 
    our enjoyment of whatever else we are doing at the same time. 

    The wasted five star hotel room: 

    Imagine you have just paid a large amount of money to stay 
    in a luxury five star hotel room. The room is magnificent and 
    has every luxury you could possible want. 

    You lie down to sleep in the superbly comfortable bed and 
    suddenly you hear a mosquito start to buzz. 

    You turn on the light and because the hotel ceiling is so high 
    you can’t get the mosquito. It buzzes in your ear all night and 
    you just can’t sleep. 

    The five star hotel room has been wasted and all because of 
    one tiny mosquito. 

    This experience is exactly what life is like when it is full of 
    these little annoyances. 

    Here’s the solution Bill gives: 

    1: Take 10 minutes and make a list of all the little things in 
    your life that annoy you. You can even make two lists if you 
    want to. One list can be for work and one list can be for your 
    personal life. Add to each list over time. You will start to 
    notice more and more things that are not quite the way you 

    would like them to be. 

    2: Pick two easy ‘mosquitoes’ and deal with them today. By 
    ‘easy’ I mean items where you know all you need to know in 
    order to fix them and also won’t take too long. 

    These could be things like clean your car, sew on a button, 
    replace a light bulb and so on. 

    Then keep going and pick at least two more ‘mosquitoes’ for 
    another day. The momentum will build. Even if you don’t get 
    the thing that irritates you fixed make sure you at least write 
    it down. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Make a list of at least 10-20 little things in your life that irritate 
    you in some way. Then take action on two of these things today 
    and notice how good you feel. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing
    www.resilientminds.co.nz  

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    The easy way to success

    One of the big barriers to achieving greater success in our 
    lives is that most of us think it’s going to take a lot of hard 
    work to get there.  

    The good news is you can often get much better results 
    in your life without having to work longer and harder hours.  

    Here’s a real life example of the easy way to success.  

    A lady called Cindy Cashman saw an interesting idea 
    ago that took her fancy. The idea was for a book with
    the title “Everything men know about women.” 

    The book was over 100 pages long and inside there was 
    nothing but blank pages.  

    Cindy liked the fun nature of the book but she didn’t like the
    he idea of having to work really hard to make a few sales. 

    So she began looking for ways to sell huge amounts of her 
    book with very little effort. 

    Cindy approached businesses like women’s clothing 
    shops and got them to display her book next to the cash 
    register. Women shopping at these stores would pick up the 
    book because of the catchy title, laugh when they saw it was 
    totally blank inside and would then buy a whole bunch to give 
    as gifts to people they knew. 

    Cindy kept the price very affordable and sold over a million  
    copies of her book over the next few years. 

    In your own life always be on the lookout for things you can 
    do that are low effort with high rewards. 

    Saying thanks, showing appreciation, displaying affection, 
    watching a sunrise or sunset, caring for a pet or a plant, 
    smiling at a casual acquaintance or stranger, committing a 
    random act of kindness, enjoying a walk in a beautiful place 
    these are all ways of getting great results with very little effort. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Write down ten things you could do this week that would create 
    more happiness in your life with very little effort. Then spend 
    five minutes each day doing some of these things. 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    Why golf balls are important for happiness

    A Professor stood before his philosophy class and 
    had some items in front of him. 

    When the class began, wordlessly, he picked up a 
    very large empty glass jar and then proceeded to 
    fill it with golf balls.  

    He asked the students if the jar was full. 

    They agreed that it was. 

    The Professor next picked up a box of sand and poured 
    it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. 

    He asked once more if the jar was full. 

    The students responded with a unanimous “yes.” 

    The Professor then produced two cups of coffee from 
    under the table and poured the entire contents into the
    jar, effectively filling the space between the grains of sand. 

    “Now,” said the professor, as the laughter subsided,
    “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life.” 

    ‘The golf balls are the important things–your family, 
    your children, your health, your friends, and your 
    favourite passions – things that if everything else was 
    lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.” 

    “The pebbles are the other things that matter like 
    your job, your house, and your car. The sand is 
    everything else -the small stuff.” 

    “If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, 
    “there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls.” 

    “The same goes for life. If you spend all your time 
    and energy on the small stuff, you will never have 
    room for the things that are important to you. 

    Pay attention to the things that are critical to your 
    happiness. Play with your children.  

    Take time to get medical checkups. 

    Take your partner out to dinner.  

    There will always be time to clean the house and 
    fix the waste disposal.” 

    “Take care of the golf balls first, the things that 
    really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.” 

    One of the students raised her hand and inquired what 
    the coffee represented. The Professor smiled. “I’m glad 
    you asked. It just goes to show you that no matter how 
    full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple 
    of cups of coffee with a friend.” 

    This story is a great reminder that taking time for the 
    important things in your life is a vital part of being happy. 

    Action Exercise: 

    1: What are the most important things in your own life?  

    Write them down. These are the golf balls in this story. 

    2: Invest some time every day on the golf balls in your life. 

    3: A great way to focus on the important things in your life
    is to set up a bucket list. This is a great way to create more
    fun, excitement and adventure in your life.  

    There is a wonderful guide called Inspired for Life that shows
    you how to set up and use a bucket list. You can download
    a complimentary copy of this guide from this link on our website. 

    Put in link to download booklet 

    At Resilient Minds we help our clients to develop high resilience
    so they can perform at high levels on the really important
    things in both their work and personal lives. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing
    www.resilientminds.co.nz  

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    Power morning questions

    Power Questions that create more happiness: 

    In his book “Awaken the giant within” motivational speaker 
    Anthony Robbins notes that our life experience is based on 
    what we focus on. 

    And what we focus on is often determined by the questions 
    we ask ourselves on a regular basis. 

    The best questions to ask yourself are what he calls 
    Power Questions. 

    Power questions are designed to cause you to experience 
    more happiness, excitement, pride, gratitude, joy, commitment, 
    and love every day of your life. 

    Anthony suggests you come up with at least two to three 
    answers to all of these questions. 

    If you have difficulty coming up with an answer, just add 
    the word “Could”. For instance you might want to ask 
    “What could I be most happy about in my life now?” 

    Here are some Power Questions you can ask yourself 
    first thing in the morning when you wake up. 

    1: What am I happy about in my life now? 

    What about that makes me happy? 

    How does that make me feel? 

    2: What am I excited about in my life now? 

    What about that makes me feel excited? 

    How does that make me feel? 

    3: What am I proud about in my life right now? 

    What about that makes me feel proud? 

    How does that make me feel? 

    4: What am I grateful about in my life right now? 

    What about that makes me feel grateful? 

    How does that make me feel? 

    Action Exercise: 

    Use some (or all) of these Morning Power Questions 
    every morning for five days and notice how good you 
    end up feeling. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    The worry buster

    In the wonderful book “How to stop worrying and start 
    living” by Dale Carnegie there is an excellent technique
    to handle worry.  

    It’s called the ‘Worry Buster’ and has four simple steps. 

    1: Define in writing exactly what you are worried about.  

    For example “I am worried about a key staff member as
    I think they want to leave and work somewhere else.” 

    Or “I am worried about a business client who is slow paying
    their invoice.” 

    1. Define in writing the Worst Possible Outcome (W.P.O.)
      of this worry.  

    If you have concerns about your key staff member, the 
    worst possible outcome is that they leave your business. 

    If you have concerns about a business client being slow 
    to pay their invoice the worst possible outcome is that you 
    never get paid. 

    1. Decide mentally to accept the worst possible outcome
      should it occur. Ask yourself will this outcome kill me?  

    Will losing your staff member kill you? Will not getting paid 
    kill you? In most cases the answer is no. (Asking this simple 
    question allows you to put your worry in perspective.) 

    1. Take action immediately to make sure the worst possible
      outcome doesn’t occur. Action is the antidote for worry. 

    If you are worried about your staff member, talk to them and
    ask if they are thinking about leaving. If they are ask if there 
    is anything you can do to make their job more enjoyable. 

    If you are worried about a client not paying you, perhaps
    you could talk with them face to face and voice your 
    concerns. You might offer them an instalment plan to 
    pay their invoice if they are in financial difficulty. 

    Action Exercise: 

    Use the Worry Buster technique on any worry you have. 
    It’s an excellent tool to eliminate worry quickly. 

     And the more worries you eliminate the happier you will feel. 

    Here at Resilient Minds we offer in house programmes that 
    give our clients the mental tools to handle any problems and 
    challenges that they face. This quickly improves performance
    and productivity for everyone involved. 

    Contact us for more details on our in house programmes. 

    Have a great week. 

    Jamie Ford
    Kim Tay
    Thought Leaders in Productivity and Wellbeing

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    You are smarter than you think

    One of the interesting things about humans is that we sometimes forget about the things we are really good at.

    Here’s a good way to test this yourself…

    Try reading these jumbled up sentences:

    Acocdrnig to an elgnsih unviesitry sutdy the oredr of letetrs in
    a wrod dosen’t mttaer, the olny thnig thta’s iopmrantt is that
    the frsit and lsat ltteer of eevry word is in the crorcet ptoision.
    The rset can be jmbueld and one is stlil able to raed the txet
    wiohtut dclftfuiiy.

    You should be able to read this very easily.

    Which goes to show your brain is actually very clever and can do a lot of things you didn’t realise it can do.

    Action Exercise:

    Take a few minutes this week to write down 10 things that you are really good at that you sometimes forget about.

    (When you focus on the things you are good at doing you tend to feel a lot more positive about yourself and life.)

    Here at Resilient Minds we are big fans of using science-backed strategies to help our clients become more resilient.

    And this exercise helps to develop a positive belief in yourself.

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    Mastering stress – 7 tips to make stress work for you not against you

    Surprise, surprise, stress is good for us. Yes, that’s right, despite all we’ve been told stress is good for us. The right kind in the right amounts.

    Think about it for a moment. How would our immune system develop and be able to deal with all kinds of nasties if it wasn’t subjected to lots of different stressors as we went through childhood and on into adult life?

    How does a vaccine work? We get a little bit of the virus and this prompts our immune system to develop the antibodies that will resist the full virus when it attacks us.

    Stress works in the same way – a moderate amount makes us tougher, and can help us learn more skills to take on the next challenge.

    When your heart is pounding, your breathing is fast and your muscles feel tense – that’s the adrenalin and cortisol racing through your body giving you the ability react quickly – the ‘flight or flight’ response.

    What you do next is the key to making stress work for you.

    1. See stress as helpful

    How you think about your stress response really matters.

    If you see it as helpful – that you’re getting more oxygen to the brain and your body is getting you powered up, ready to take on the challenge – this belief does two important things. Firstly, it makes you feel less anxious and more confident. Secondly, it keeps your blood vessels relaxed (rather than constricted, which, over time, can lead to a heart attack).

    2. Reach out for social support

    Connecting with other people enhances the physical benefits of the other hormone that your stress response has triggered – oxytocin.

    Just like adrenalin, oxytocin is also released when we’re stressed, and it’s designed to get us to seek social connection. Known as the ‘hug drug’, oxytocin helps heart cells regenerate and helps us recover faster from stress. So in addition to the ‘flight or flight’ response to stress, we also have this ‘tend and befriend’ response.

    If there’s no one around, give yourself a hug. Put your right hand on your left shoulder and your left hand on your right shoulder. Let your chin relax down between your crossed arms and enjoy the feeling of good long hug.

    3. Cut the stress short

    Too much cortisol and adrenalin over a long period of time can lead to anxiety, depression, headaches, weight gain, and more health problems.

    Stop imagining the worst possible outcomes. For example, imagining the customer who found a slug in their salad will write a terrible review, ruining your business (and you’ll die penniless and alone…).

    Instead, think of the best possible or most likely outcome and put your focus on doing what you can to make that happen (e.g. helping the waiter get the customer to see this in perspective – even the Queen gets slugs in her salad – and make amends with a free dessert).

    4. Breathe

    Put your hand on your heart (to focus your attention there and not on your racing mind), breathe in for a count of four and out for a count of six to get a smooth and even heart rate. This helps your brain to think more clearly by calming and regulating the signals its getting from the heart.

    5. Learn and practise meditation

    There are even free courses and apps to help you get started. The benefits of ‘quietening the mind’ kick in surprisingly quickly and increase with time, making changes to the brain that help with focus, managing emotions and reducing cortisol.

    6. Get moving

    Exercise reduces cortisol and adrenaline, and increases endorphins making us feel more positive and helping us to master stress.

    7. Smile and laugh more

    In case you were in any doubt about how useful positive emotions are to us, science shows they help us master stress by un-doing the physiological effects of anxiety and anger, and making us more creative at solving problems. Add more childlike playfulness to your life; watch funny videos, tv shows and movies; ask people to tell you the funniest joke they can remember; and savour those times when you do smile and laugh – and do it for longer.

    As a starter for 10, here’s the world’s funniest joke from the research scientist Richard Wiseman did in 2015 (read more about that fascinating study here):

    Two hunters are out in the woods when one of them collapses. He doesn’t seem to be breathing and his eyes are glazed.  The other guy whips out his phone and calls the emergency services.  He gasps, “My friend is dead! What can I do?”.  The operator says “Calm down.  I can help.  First, let’s make sure he’s dead.”  There is a silence, then a shot is heard.  Back on the phone, the guy says “OK, now what?”

    Five years after the research study, Wiseman found the original source of the joke: Spike Milligan! A lovely coda to the research.

    (An earlier version of this article was first published in the December 2018 edition of the Restaurant Association’s magazine Savour)

    The Recipe for Resilience

    With figures showing the world is facing a tsunami of depression and tragically high rates of suicide here in New Zealand, there is good reason to be concerned about mental health and wellbeing. Particularly for people working in high stress, fast paced, pressure cooker environments like the restaurant industry.

    The good news is science has uncovered a kind of ‘vaccine’ for depression. Not only can this ‘mental toughness vaccine’ help prevent depression, but it can also enhance our lives by increasing productivity, creativity, motivation and physical health.

    The core ingredient of ‘mental toughness’ is having an optimistic mindset. Fortunately, this type of mindset is a learned skill – not just being lucky when the genes get handed out at birth. When we think of optimism, we tend to think of happy people who look on the bright side of life, ‘glass half full’ types. While there is some truth in that, what we’re talking about is deeper, more specific than simply seeing the world as full of all things good.

    The recipe for an optimistic mindset is based on the ground breaking work of Dr Martin Seligman, one of the most influential psychologists of the 21st century. His work has led to hundreds of scientific studies exploring the benefits of learning to use an optimistic mindset.

    Mindset Matters Most

    Seligman examined the thinking styles of people who are able to bounce back from adversity, and who can easily get on a roll after brief success. It’s about keeping our internal ‘self-talk’ on the right track, and using more helpful thoughts to drive how we feel and act, rather than letting momentary emotions take charge.

    When faced with a setback, unfortunately it’s human nature to catastrophise the event in our mind. It can often be one of three default settings we use to explain the cause of adversity (a fire in the kitchen, a rude diner, a mistake with an order). There is permanent (“customers are always ungrateful”), global, affecting all aspects of our life (“everything is so stressful”), and personal (“I’m hopeless at all this stuff”).

    When something good happens, often we’re too quick to think of it as a temporary success, one specific only to this particular situation and mainly due to external forces, rather than our own skill or talent. (For instance “what a huge tip, I’ll probably never get another one like that again.”

    The proven style of optimistic thinking is about seeing our setbacks as temporary or fleeting. That they are specific to that one event or situation and mainly due to circumstances or factors outside our control (“Tough day, last night’s big night out has made a few people cranky”.)

    Just as importantly, when things go well, we need to capitalise on that success, big or small, by thinking of it as permanent – “I always…” – and applicable to other areas of life. We need to find aspects of that success that are due to ‘me’ – my efforts, skills or talent.

    Data from thousands of New Zealanders who’ve had their thinking styles tested show that we are quite a pessimistic bunch when it comes to how we see the causes of our successes. We love to be humble and knock those tall poppies down, but we actually need to high-five ourselves more.

    So there’s work to be done, but it can be learnt, and the pay-off can be huge. We hope to be sharing more with you on this in the future, but in the meantime:

    1. When the proverbial hits the fan think PIP – “put it into perspective’. Treat it like a speed bump on the highway of life, not a landslide that has destroyed the whole transport network.
    2. Don’t sweat the small stuff.
    3. Put your energy into what you can control and let the other stuff slide away.
    4. Think of bad events in terms of being temporary, specific and the ‘result of many factors’ alongside your part in it.
    5. Think of the good stuff that happens in terms of permanent / always, everything / universal and ‘me’.

    It’s your mindset that matters most.

    First published in “Savour” – the  magazine of the Restaurant Association of New Zealand

    BY KIM TAY & JAMIE FORD DIRECTORS, RESILIENT MINDS

    Carving new pathways using mindful mental toughness

    Talking with Jesse Mulligan on RNZ National, Jamie Ford explains how resilient people tend to think of bad events as a bit of a speedbump, while the less resilient think setbacks will be much more permanent.

    “What the science shows us … is that the [resilient] people are handling adversities, they’re not getting derailed, they’re not being destroyed by them,” Ford says.

    “They have this unique pattern of thinking about the way adversities occur and they also have another unique way of thinking about the good things that go on in life, the successes that occur.”

    But while some people are more inclined to resilience, he says it is nurture more so than nature that determines where we are on the spectrum.

    “It’s the environment that we’re in and the way that the people around us think, behave … the way we are told to think about things and whether we’re nurtured with hope about life.”

    And the key to developing a resilient mind is repetition.

    ”We want to shut down the old neural pathways that have developed … those eight-lane superhighways that we built in our childhoods which are quite normal and comfortable for us, and [we] need to get out the machete, carve our way through the bush, make a rough track.

    “And over time, as we keep using that pattern then we build up new neural pathways and that’s really good for our wellbeing.”

    The process begins by using a diagnostic to chart the current unhelpful thinking patterns, and from then there is coaching, practice and tools to learn the language of resilience.

    “And not waiting for emotion before we take the action, but to actually take the action and then emotion will catch up.”

    Does psychometric testing really work?

    Psychometric tests are useful tools for employers when the appropriate test is used for the right reasons. One of the most scientifically validated diagnostics, the SASQ, is highly useful for recruitment – to select the most resilient and productive talent, and for identifying learning and development needs. It provides an in-depth report on an individual’s levels of resilient and optimistic thinking patterns, which has been shown to be directly connected to performance at work, as well as in the areas of sport, academic achievement and health. Jamie Ford speaks with Liam Dann (NZ Herald Business Editor-at-Large)  about the value and use of psych. tests after the IRD found itself embroiled in unnecessary controversy by planning to use them in a redundancy and restructuring context. He suggests that a diagnostic like the SASQ would be useful to help prepare and equip people for the types of upheaval restructuring brings. https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business-video/news/video.cfm?c_id=1503079&gal_cid=1503079&gallery_id=183145

    The magic of “X Factor” thinking

    Marketing guru Graham McGregor interviews Jamie Ford on the vital mindset that underpins success – ‘Mental Toughness’ (MT).  The ideas underpinning ‘X Factor’ thinking are explained in ways that make it simple to understand and easy to use.  The improvements in performance and productivity are proven to work, backed up by 40 years of extensive research, and bring benefits across all aspects of life – work, sport, academic achievement and health and wellbeing. Learn why some people get remarkable results, while others fail miserably, given the same set of circumstances.

    Mindset matters most for businesses

    It takes more mental toughness to be a successful business owner than it does to be an All Black. Here we share insights on how mental toughness helps business owners perform better and succeed quicker, including a 5 step action plan.

    Karl had been down in the dumps and getting demotivated for more than three months.

    With the help of a business coach he had written a business plan with ambitious goals for his business two years ago, but it wasn’t happening. Now he often worried that the business would end up as ‘road kill’ like so many other owner operated businesses, rather than the success he had dreamed of.

    Unfortunately Karl’s business coach was not familiar with one vital element necessary for turning ambition into success – the requirement for ‘mental toughness’.

    Shortly after we met Karl completed a mental toughness assessment and that showed exactly where things were going wrong. He had a ‘pessimistic’ mindset and no business plan or goal-setting was going to overcome that.

    With some expert coaching in mental toughness he soon had a complete change of attitude and found it much easier doing the ‘hard yards’ needed to achieve his business goals and make a success of his business.

    Karl had fallen victim to the fallacy of assuming awesome goals automatically lead to awesome results. The facts are otherwise as many business owners will avow. A mentally tough and optimistic mindset is the absolutely vital ingredient in developing and maintaining high levels of drive, energy and motivation.

    Business owners are under huge pressures every day of every week of every year, and even many times during the course of one day. The All Blacks are under nothing like that level of constant pressure.

    Fortunately good science has now unpacked the ingredients of mental toughness and we know it is a learned skill, not a matter of being lucky when the genes get handed out at birth. Generally it doesn’t get much thought until a lack of it shows it’s face, as in Karl’s case. But anyone who applies themselves can learn to be much more mentally tough than the average Kiwi business owner.

    Being mentally tough means you will:

    • Worry less and use your energy for more constructive actions, taking your business forward.
    • Be healthier with a positive attitude and be much less likely to get down-in-the-dumps when trouble comes over the horizon with your name written on it.
    • Pick yourself up much faster from the knocks that are part and parcel of owning a business.
    • Be much more motivated to use the pressures you experience as a way of gaining new insights on how to improve the performance of your business.
    • Find you have levels of ‘drive’ to succeed that you only dreamed of previously.

     

    Your 5-step mental toughness action plan 

    1. Live above the line and take ownership of your thoughts, moods and emotions. Don’t pass the buck and whine about how other people have upset and demotivated you when that’s an outcome of your own thinking about what is going on.
    2. Only concern yourself with what you can control and let the other stuff slide away. This will leverage your capabilities instead of exhausting them on wild goose chases.
    3. Put yourself at risk of succeeding by seeing every failure as a stepping stone to success. Be like Thomas Edison and get comfortable with failure as a normal part of owning a business. Edison had a mentally tough mindset and it shows in this famous quote of his: “I failed my way to success”.
    4. Focus on flourishing more than ‘coping’. Coping is a weak and ineffective outcome; you have your nose above the water but the next ripple of adversity will take you under. Being mentally tough is about having a mindset that enables you to flourish even in the most adverse circumstances.
    5. Get the insights for building more mental toughness by taking an assessment, getting an action plan, and an expert mental toughness coach to work alongside you.

    First published in NZ Business Magazine, March 2017

    Why are Australians are more resilient than Kiwis?

    Jamie Ford discusses this contentious topic with Simon Pound from the SpinOff. How come the suicide rate of young Aussies is 50% less than here in NZ but not one person in the helping professions uses the Seligman Attributional Style Questionnaire to gain valuable insights into the root causes?

    We bag Australians because we say they’re so arrogant; we bag Americans because they’re so brash. But in fact what we’re reflecting on there is the fact that they’re more resilient and they’re much more optimistic. Australians and Americans tell me that the negativity in New Zealand hits them like a wall when they get off the plane.

    There is a huge amount of research that shows how learning the thinking skills of resilience can act as a ‘vaccination’ against depression.

    Read more here:

    https://thespinoff.co.nz/podcast/business-is-boring-callaghan/07-06-2017/why-australians-are-more-resilient-than-kiwis/

     

     

    Football club introduces mental toughness training

    The Hibiscus Coast AFC are introducing sports psychology into the training, with mental toughness coach Jamie Ford, to ensure the players have the right mindset during games and training. Read the full article here in the Rodney Times 25 January 2017 https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/rodney-times/88726209/hibiscus-coast-afc-looking-for-strong-start-to-season

    Using resilience in the job hunt

    Jamie Ford shares 5 tips for staying resilient in the job hunt with the NZ Herald on 8 Feb 2017.
    It can be tough looking for a job, but fatigue, rejection and loss of confidence can be helped by developing a “resilient mindset”. This means perceiving that the reasons for setbacks often have limited duration, are quite restricted in their extent, and contain many factors over which we have no control.

    Resilience can be thought of as an “optimistic mindset” and involves paying attention to the language and words we use, because lots of us inadvertently use pessimistic language in the way we talk about our successes and failures.

    The power of a resilient mindset is in enabling us to tackle tasks with energy and enthusiasm by thinking about the outcome.

    It also enables us to put time into context and see that the hours invested in finding a new job are very few compared to the many years spent working over a lifetime.

    Five tips for staying resilient in the job hunt:

    1. Use optimistic language and thoughts in all aspects of the process.

    2. Remind yourself there is an employer out there looking for someone with knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are uniquely yours.

    3. Keep in mind that every time you’re declined, you’re one application closer to the job that will really engage you.

    4. Maximise your power over factors that influence your emotions. Cognitive psychology now proves Eleanor Roosevelt’s belief that, “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”

    5. Put yourself at risk of succeeding. Edison said, “I failed my way to success”. The resilient simply perceive failure as a temporary state of affairs on the road to success.

    How to bounce back quickly from a break-up

    The breakdown of any relationship is devastating. But, while shocking, confusing and catastrophic, surviving (and ultimately thriving) after a split is possible. Resilience is key.

    Jamie Ford shared tips to the NZ Herald on how to use resilience to not only survive but grow from a break-up.

    A resilient mindset is more than the ability to quickly bounce back from the adversities and setbacks that occur in life. It also plays an important part in keeping someone attracted to you when you’re in a relationship.

    For example, “the positive person who is not easily derailed,” Jamie says, “is much more attractive than the person who gets down in the dumps and stays there for quite some time banging on about their misfortune”.

    Aside from that, resilience can make you a better significant other by ensuring you:

    • Don’t sweat the small stuff and put unnecessary pressure on your partner and your relationship.
    •  Easily put issues behind you. You can bury the hatchet quickly and forget where you buried it.
    • Don’t have a mind-reading licence so you always assume good intentions on the part of your partner. Even if you find out otherwise, you can be forgiving more easily than the person lacking resilience.

    In the face of heartbreak, the power of a resilient attitude is priceless.

    The world we live in is one that scientists deem increasingly egotistical and self-centred. Which has lead to many of us “assuming far too much responsibility for outcomes in which we have only played a small part in”.

    A healthy dose of resilience, therefore, can put things in to perspective and make mending a broken heart more manageable by bringing to mind:

    • The many factors that led to the heartbreak and using them to get some balance alongside the tendency to over-exaggerate our part in it.
    • All of the good things we gained through the relationship which will stay with us for life.
    • The attractive, desirable qualities of the other person that help us see them as a normal person, not some evil monster.

    But, perhaps most importantly, resilience will see you getting over a bad break-up fast so you can go back to being the attractive person others want to meet and get to know.

    FIVE STEPS FOR MOVING ON

    For a step-by-step guide to not only survive but grow from a break-up, you need to keep in mind five important points.

    1. This is temporary

    Nothing lasts forever so it won’t be long before this too shall past. Soon, you will be over it and back on the dating scene.

    2. It’s not all your fault

    For every one thing you are responsible for, try and think of another nine things contributing to the break-up that you had no control over. It takes two to tango after all.

    3. Create context

    This will help you see this temporary setback as a small portion of your life rather than all of your life. For example, if you live to 90 that means there will be 32,850 days in your lifetime. This relationship ran for nine months (273 days). That’s 0.83 per cent of your lifetime, that’s not even 1 per cent of your lifetime. So, in the grand scheme of things, perhaps it’s not worth crying/stressing over?

    4. Don’t be a sore loser

    Always speak well of the other person and make sure that in conversations your break-up is not the only thing you talk about.

    5. Take back control of your happiness

    Watch some funny movies to cheer yourself up. Remember that you have a great deal of control over your emotions by taking care of the way you think about the break-up.

    Don’t consider yourself a resilient person? You can build on that by adopting a resilient style of thinking. For instance, rather than feeling sad about being dumped, look at it like you had a lucky escape and remind yourself that there are plenty more fish in the sea.

    Also remember that while they didn’t treasure and appreciate you, this doesn’t make you any less lovable or attractive.

    Every time you find yourself thinking about how awful it is, how unfair it is, and how you will never be happy again, Ford suggests tapping your hand on something solid like a desk or table top before shouting (or saying quietly to yourself depending on the setting): “STOP! You are on the wrong track!”

    Then, hone in on the aforementioned resilient thoughts once more. This is the key to building up and maximising a resilient mind over time. Before long, you’ll find your bad mood lifting and life will become enjoyable again.

    Read the original article here:

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11817919

    Out in the elements and loving it

    Jamie Ford enjoys riding a motorcycle in his down-time. His choice of bike suits his personality – the Honda 1000 Africa Twin is an adventure bike, he tells the NZ Herald Driven: “I like adventures and exploring. It takes courage to get the best from it, and that suits me”. – NZ Herald Driven 22 April 2017 

    https://www.driven.co.nz/news/lifestyle/me-my-bike-out-in-the-elements-and-loving-it/